Hell is empty and all the devils are here.: I forget what it’s like to be in love. What it’s like to be someone’s...

iamforeverkatie:

I forget what it’s like to be in love.

What it’s like to be

someone’s favorite person.

If someone asked me,

“Have you ever been in love?”

I could say yes, but don’t ask me

what it feels like.

I don’t remember.

In fact, I’m not sure

what love is.

More importantly though, is that

I’m not…

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The Thieves of Manhattan by Adam Langer
I found Adam Langer’s most recent novel/memoir in a warehouse filled with free books that weren’t fit to sell in bookstores (torn, double printed in one book, missing pages). Among the many books I snatched up that day, The Thieves of Manhattan was one of them. There’s nothing wrong with the book, give or take a few small creases on the front or back cover; in other words, it was pretty much a steal, the book was in good condition.
Being the first summer book that I’ve finished, it has convinced me that I started off this summer right. The book is great. Although it is no J.K. Rowling, Arthur Conan Doyle, Nicholas Sparks (thank God), or any classical literary genius, the book is a small beauty. 
I don’t want to dive into the plot line. It’s just too easy to spoil in synopsis. But don’t worry, the book does have its fair share of twists and turns, give or take a few predictable, if not cheesy, scenes. The main character, Ian Minot, is a struggling writer whose work is constantly being rejected while other authors with fanatical “memoirs” take over the scene of the publishing world. His life is practically a depressing mess of a wanna-a-be established writer. 
And then he meets The Confident Man.
One of the things I like best about Langer’s book is his kick for a good story.  You’ll know what I’m talking about once you finish it. I also adored how Langer used different literary “slang” to call certain things. I can definitely see myself saying “gatsby” as a stylish man’s sport coat, or “kerouac” as a verb to describe the act of taking a cross-country road trip.. 
Now the fangirl part of me needs to show this little tweet I received from the author after complimenting him on his novel/memoir. 

Adam Langer also provides a playlist for each book he’s written. Something I might do if I ever publish. 
Playlist

The Thieves of Manhattan by Adam Langer

I found Adam Langer’s most recent novel/memoir in a warehouse filled with free books that weren’t fit to sell in bookstores (torn, double printed in one book, missing pages). Among the many books I snatched up that day, The Thieves of Manhattan was one of them. There’s nothing wrong with the book, give or take a few small creases on the front or back cover; in other words, it was pretty much a steal, the book was in good condition.

Being the first summer book that I’ve finished, it has convinced me that I started off this summer right. The book is great. Although it is no J.K. Rowling, Arthur Conan Doyle, Nicholas Sparks (thank God), or any classical literary genius, the book is a small beauty. 

I don’t want to dive into the plot line. It’s just too easy to spoil in synopsis. But don’t worry, the book does have its fair share of twists and turns, give or take a few predictable, if not cheesy, scenes. The main character, Ian Minot, is a struggling writer whose work is constantly being rejected while other authors with fanatical “memoirs” take over the scene of the publishing world. His life is practically a depressing mess of a wanna-a-be established writer. 

And then he meets The Confident Man.

One of the things I like best about Langer’s book is his kick for a good story.  You’ll know what I’m talking about once you finish it. I also adored how Langer used different literary “slang” to call certain things. I can definitely see myself saying “gatsby” as a stylish man’s sport coat, or “kerouac” as a verb to describe the act of taking a cross-country road trip.. 

Now the fangirl part of me needs to show this little tweet I received from the author after complimenting him on his novel/memoir. 

Photobucket

Adam Langer also provides a playlist for each book he’s written. Something I might do if I ever publish. 

Playlist